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Legal Implications of Motorcycle Accidents

Learn more about the legal implications following a motorcycle accident

Road traffic accidents are a common occurrence in the UK, with thousands of accidents happening every year. These accidents can have serious consequences, both in terms of physical harm to individuals involved and legal implications. Understanding the legal implications of road traffic accidents is essential, whether you are a driver, passenger, or pedestrian. In this article, we will explore the legal obligations and responsibilities of those involved in road traffic accidents in the UK.

Legal Obligations of Road Traffic Accidents

The first thing to consider when involved in a road traffic accident is the legal obligations that come with it. In the UK, the law requires drivers to stop at the scene of an accident and provide their name and address, as well as their vehicle registration number, to anyone who has reasonable grounds for asking. Failure to do so is an offense that can result in fines, penalty points on your driving license, and even imprisonment.

Furthermore, drivers must report the accident to the police within 24 hours if they were involved in a collision with another vehicle or property, and someone was injured or killed. Failure to do so is an offense that can result in a fine, penalty points, and even disqualification from driving. Drivers must also exchange insurance details with anyone involved in the accident and report it to their insurer as soon as possible.

If you are a pedestrian or cyclist involved in an accident with a vehicle, you are also required to provide your name and address to the driver or anyone else who has reasonable grounds for asking. Failure to do so is an offense that can result in a fine. Pedestrians and cyclists should also report the accident to the police if they were injured or if damage was caused to property other than their own.

Who is Responsible for Road Traffic Accidents?

Determining who is responsible for a road traffic accident can be complex, and it is often a matter for the courts to decide. However, in general, the driver who caused the accident is considered to be responsible. This is because all drivers have a legal duty to drive with care and attention, and failure to do so can result in an accident.

In some cases, however, other parties may be held responsible. For example, if the accident was caused by a defect in the road surface, the local council or highways agency responsible for maintaining the road may be liable. Similarly, if the accident was caused by a defect in the vehicle, such as faulty brakes, the manufacturer or garage responsible for maintaining the vehicle may be held responsible.

It is also worth noting that passengers in a vehicle involved in an accident may be entitled to compensation, even if they were not driving. If the accident was caused by the driver of the vehicle in which they were traveling, they may be able to claim compensation with the help of National Claims. 

Consequences of Road Traffic Accidents

The consequences of road traffic accidents can be severe, both in terms of physical harm and legal implications. In the event of an accident, the police will investigate and may bring criminal charges against those involved. This can result in fines, penalty points on your driving license, and even imprisonment.

If you are found to be responsible for an accident, you may also face civil claims for compensation from those affected. This can include claims for damage to property, personal injury, and loss of earnings. The amount of compensation awarded will depend on the severity of the injuries sustained and the impact they have on the individual’s life.

How Long Do You Have to Make a Road Traffic Accident Compensation Claim?

In the UK, there is a time limit for making a personal injury claim following a road traffic accident. This is usually three years from the date of the accident. However, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, if the person making the claim was under 18 at the time of the accident, they have until their 21st birthday to make a claim. 

Similarly, if the person making the claim was mentally incapacitated at the time of the accident, there is no time limit for making a claim.

It is important to note that it is always best to make a claim as soon as possible after the accident. This is because it can take time to gather evidence and prepare a case, and waiting too long could mean that crucial evidence is lost or witnesses are no longer available.

A parked black motorbike

Conclusion

Road traffic accidents can have serious consequences, both in terms of physical harm and legal implications. Understanding the legal obligations and responsibilities that come with a road traffic accident is essential, whether you are a driver, passenger, or pedestrian. 

Remember to stop at the scene of an accident, exchange details with anyone involved, and report the accident to the police if necessary. If you have been injured in a road traffic accident, it is important to seek legal guidance as soon as possible to ensure that you receive the compensation you are entitled to.

Contact us today at National Claims to get a start on your claim.

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